“Around the table, we offer friendship and celebrate life. Our meals offer a divine moment, an opportunity
for people to be seduced by grace into a better life, a truer life, and a more human existence.”

Join us for an opportunity for fellowship, conversation, and togetherness during Walden Hill Wednesdays! Bringing us all together to share a fellowship dinner, listen to and participate in contemplative discussions and attend your meetings, classes, or groups on each Wednesday night of the month. These evenings will also include programming for our children and youth through our Faith Development and Walden Hill Youth Programs. Childcare for children 6 months – 4 years will be available from 6:15 – 7:00 pm.

Walden Hill Wednesday 

Wednesdays | 5:30 pm Supper | 6:15 pm Fireside Forum

Tupper Supper
Wednesdays from 5:30 – 6:15 pm
First UU Commons
Free will donation suggestion: $5/person $20/family.

Join us each Wednesday night for dinner and fellowship at First UU. Cook teams will cook and serve each meal. Stay for the forum that follows..

Fireside Forums
6:15 – 7:00 pm Hearth Room/Zoom

Walden Hill Youth (WHY)
6:15 – 7:00 pm
Walden Hill Youth (WHY) brings our youth together in fellowship, service and spiritual practice weekly to hang out, plan activities, and participate in youth fundraisers, service projects, and fellowship events. Sign up HERE.

Come join in this weekly opportunity to get to know fellow members and friends of the church on a more personal level. Share the pleasures of food & drink, hospitality, conversation, and togetherness.

Tupper Supper is named in honor of Eliza Tupper Wilkes. Tupper Wilkes was one of the first female Universalist ministers and was ordained at our First Universalist Society Church in Rochester, MN in 1871. Tupper Wilkes was the organizer of numerous mission churches in eastern Dakota Territory and western Minnesota and Iowa. She settled in the village of Sioux Falls in 1878 with her husband. There, Tupper Wilkes continued her community involvement, including the organization of the Ladies’ History Club and the public library. She continued her ministry by preaching occasionally in local churches and fostering a small group of liberal believers.